IB Classes

The Six Academic Subjects

Students are required to study both the humanities and the sciences. Diploma Program (DP) students must select one subject from each of the six groups. At least three and not more than four are taken at higher level (HL); the others at standard level (SL). HL courses are taken over two years; SL courses are typically taught over one year. Students are thus able to explore some subjects in depth and others more broadly. Active citizenship and global perspectives are encouraged in each area of the curriculum.

Group 1 – Language A1

LANGUAGE A1 HIGHER LEVEL
INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE
Level VI
Prerequisite: English 10 Honors
4 Semesters, 4 Credits
Offered 4 Consecutive Semesters

Language A1 Higher Level, International Baccalaureate, is a pre-university literature course consisting of four semesters of study. The course promotes an appreciation of literature and knowledge of the student’s own culture, along with that of other societies, and develops the student’s powers of expression, both in oral and written communication. The course emphasizes the skills involved in writing and speaking in a variety of styles and situations and offers the student the opportunity to read 11-15 works grouped by genres. The four semesters are taken consecutively in the following order, starting with the student’s junior year: Themes in Literature (Part IV of the IB curriculum, School’s Free Choice); World Literature (Part I of the IB curriculum, World Literature); Genres of Literature (Part II of the IB curriculum, Detailed Study); and Drama (Part III of the IB curriculum, Group of Works). Students enrolled in the IB classes will be required to take the IB examinations as part of their course requirements.

Group 2 – Second language

FRENCH, GERMAN, SPANISH IV
IB FRENCH, GERMAN, SPANISH-SL
Core 40 and AHD Course
Prerequisite: Levels I, II and III or Placement by Exam
2 Semesters, 2 Credits
Grades 11, 12

Level IV world language courses enable students to participate in classroom and extracurricular activities related to the language studied, such as presentations to the student body and to parent groups and taking leadership roles in language clubs. Students are willing to participate in conversations with native and advanced non-native speakers, either in their community or in the school. This course also enables students to: (1) respond to factual and interpretive questions, interact in complex social situations, and express opinions and make judgments; (2) give presentations on cultural topics including: (a) traditions, (b) historical and contemporary events, and (c) major historical and artistic figures; (3) paraphrase or restate what someone else has said; (4) read for comprehension from a variety of longer authentic materials, such as newspapers and magazine articles, novels, and essays, as well as make judgments about what is read; (5) write well-organized compositions on a given topic; and (6) begin using the language creatively in writing simple poetry and prose. Students are also: (1) aware of the relationship between various art forms in at least one major historical period; (2) aware of the major literary, musical, and artistic periods and genres of at least one of the cultures in which the language is spoken; (3) able to adjust speech appropriate to the situation and audience; and (4) able to participate appropriately in a variety of specific circumstances which could include public meetings, attending concerts, and using public transportation.

FRENCH, GERMAN, SPANISH V
IB FRENCH, GERMAN, SPANISH – SL
Core 40 and AHD Course
Prerequisites: Levels I, II and III  or Placement by Exam
2 Semesters, 2 Credits
Grades 11, 12

Level V world language courses enable students to participate in activities beyond the classroom that could include concerts, theater performances, and community activities. Students are willing to participate in conversations with native speakers in the community and promote among their peers, and others, the benefits of world language study and the study of the cultures in which the language is spoken. In addition, students are able to: (1) initiate and participate in conversations on current or past events that are of significance in the foreign culture; (2) develop and propose solutions to issues and problems that are of concern to members of their own culture and the foreign culture being studied; (3) demonstrate an understanding of the principal elements of nonfiction, articles in newspapers, magazines, and e-mail on topics of current and historical importance to members of the culture; (4) analyze the main plot, subplot, characters and their descriptions, roles, and significance in authentic literary texts; (5) create stories and poems, short plays, and skits based on personal experiences and exposure to themes, ideas, and perspectives from the foreign cultures; and (6) summarize the content of an article intended for native speakers in order to discuss the topics in writing for speakers of the language. Additionally, students: (1) gain a general knowledge of the major literary and artistic movements within the cultures where the target language is spoken; (2) become aware of the relationships in these periods among the various art forms; and (3) demonstrate near native behaviors, using the appropriate verbal and nonverbal cues in a variety of cultural contexts, that reflect both peer-group and adult activities within the cultures studied.

Group 3 – Individuals and societies

IB PSYCHOLOGY (SL) 2 Semesters, 2 Credits
Grades 11 & 12

IB Psychology (SL) is the systematic study of behavior and experience. The required areas of study are biological psychology, cognitive psychology, learning psychology, and research methods. Students also focus on the optional area of dysfunctional psychology and complete a partial replication of an experiment as the internal assessment. The academic rigor of this course is in line with the goals of the IB diploma program and aims to prepare students for future university level courses and the IB internal and external exams, which may lead to university level credits.

It is highly recommended that those wanting to take this course complete the traditional one semester psychology class in advance, as well as have been enrolled in Honors level English classes.

 

IB History HL
4 Semesters, 4 Credits
Students need a GPA of 3.0 to register for this course or signature of World History Teacher. (Honors English classes recommended)
Grades 11 and 12

This two-year rotating course examines the history of the Americas with emphasis on the history of the United States. One half of the course will focus on the history of the Americas from approximately 1880-1980 and will emphasize three main developments: the Mexican Revolution, the Second World War, and the political movements and trends in the post-war Americas. The other half of the course will provide an in-depth study of issues in the 20th Century. These topics will include an examination of the origins and nature of wars in the 20th Century in two different regions of the World, the Cold War, and the Arab-Israeli Conflict. Students will submit an IB Historical Examination at the end of their junior year. Students will sit for the IB examination at the end of their senior year.

Each half of this course will be offered every other year, so students are encouraged to take this into account when planning their junior and senior years

IB Route 2: 20th Century World History SL 2 semester 2 credits
Grades 11,12

This course is one of a two-year IB history program, it is the SL portion. This course continues to examine world history from an international perspective by examining in depth certain 20th century topics. This course will challenge students while providing them the opportunity to explore and make sense of both the great diversity and inter-relatedness of world history. The purpose of this course is to develop an awareness and appreciation of world citizenship by gaining a better understanding of the present through a thoughtful look at the past. This portion of the course can follow up on the US history requirement of the State of Indiana. This course focuses on the causes, practices and the effects of certain 20th Century wars, the Cold War from 1945-1995, and a particularly deep focus on the Arab-Israeli conflict 1945-1979. Political, economic, religious, technological, and social issues will be considered as well as cultural elements and themes when relevant. Globalization and technological development today make it increasingly important for students to become aware of the interdependence of societies. Students will be encouraged to foster respect and understanding of people and events in cultures different from their own. Students will examine the role of the historian in shaping society.

Group 4 – Experimental sciences

IB BIOLOGY, HL
Prerequisites: Biology I (Honors highly recommended);
Chemistry I (Honors highly recommended)
4 Semesters, 1 Credit per Semester
Grades 11, 12

Biology Higher Level, International Baccalaureate focuses on six core topics: cells, the chemistry of life, genetics, ecology, evolution, and human health and physiology. Students must complete additional study in eight topics: nucleic acids and proteins, cell respiration and photosynthesis, human reproduction, defense against infectious disease, nerves, muscles and movement, excretion, and plant science. Optional course topics for students include diet and human nutrition, physiology of exercise, neurobiology and behavior, applied plant and animal science, and ecology and conservation.

• Fulfills Core 40 Biology requirement • Applies to Core 40 electives • Applies to AHD additional requirements

IB BIOLOGY, SL
Prerequisites: Biology I (Honors highly recommended);
Chemistry I (Honors highly recommended)
4 Semesters, 1 Credit per Semester
Grades 11, 12

Biology Standard Level, International Baccalaureate focuses on six core topics: cells, the chemistry of life, genetics, ecology, evolution, and human health and physiology. Optional course topics include neurobiology and behavior, applied plant and animal science, ecology and conservation, diet and human nutrition, physiology of exercise, and cell respiration and photosynthesis.

• Fulfills Core 40 Biology requirement • Applies to Core 40 electives • Applies to AHD additional requirements

IB CHEMISTRY, SL Grades 11, 12

Chemistry Standard Level, International Baccalaureate is designed to introduce students to the theories and practical techniques involved in the composition, characterization, and transformation of substances. As the central science, the chemical principles investigated underpin both the physical world in which we live and all biological systems. Students study eleven core topics: stoichiometry, atomic theory, periodicity, bonding, states of matter, energetics, kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, oxidation and reduction, and organic chemistry. Optional course topics include medicines and drugs, human biochemistry, environmental chemistry, chemical industries, and fuels and energy. Higher physical organic chemistry is a further option.

IB PHYSICS, SL
(Prerequisite: Physics I)
Grades 11, 12

The Standard Level (SL) IB Physics I course at Goshen High School is designed to be consistent with IBO aims and objectives and will include the SL Physics core topics such as studies of motion, force, energy, momentum, waves, sound, light, electricity and a new unit on Global Climate. Some additional higher level core topics, IB Option C Digital Technology, and IB Option E Astrophysics will also be included. The course will include lab work and emphasize critical and analytical thinking. Students will be encouraged to develop their curiosity and knowledge about the physical world.

Group 5 – Mathematics  Mathematics SL

IB MATH STUDIES
Prerequisite: Final Grade of B or higher each semester in Algebra II
2 semester 2 credits
Grades 11,12

Course Description: The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the basic concepts and techniques associated with the graphing calculator, number sense, algebraic concepts, sets, logic, probability, functions, geometry, trigonometry, financial mathematics, and introductory differential calculus. Graphing calculators and other technology will be used extensively in both the development and the application of these topics. Students will get experience answering questions similar to those that could be on the Exam 1 and 2 of International Baccalaureate Math Studies SL.

Math Studies SL is a course for students with varied backgrounds and abilities. It is designed to build confidence and encourage an appreciation of mathematics in students who do not anticipate a need for mathematics in their future studies.

A weighted grade for two semesters can be earned in this course provided the IB requirements are met including completion of the IB exam in May.

Group 6 – The arts or elective

IB MUSIC SL/HL
LEVEL I

Co-requisite: In a GHS performance class or approval by Music Department Chairperson
1 semester 1 credits
Grades 10, 11,12

This course encompasses an overview of music theory, western art music history, and world music. In this semester students will study the musical elements of melody, harmony, rhythm, texture and tonality. Students will also study and master modes, scale structures, rhythmic structures, key signatures, intervals, and chords. Students are responsible for keeping a notebook of materials assembled from class work, participation in class activities, assignments, projects, quizzes, and tests. The objective of this course is for students to develop their knowledge, understanding, and perception of music in relation to time, place and cultures. Developing a better understanding of all types and styles of organizations in which they may be involved. The student should possess basic music reading skills. This course cannot be taken in successive semesters. Students will begin work on music projects and listening requirements for certification in IB Music. the semester will culminate with the completion of a Musical Links Investigation project in which students will study two music cultures in depth.

IB MUSIC SL/HL
LEVEL II
Prerequisite: IB Music Level I

Co-requisite: In a GHS performance class or approval by Music Department Chairperson
1 semester 1 credits
Grades 10, 11,12

This course encompasses an overview of music theory, western art music history, and world music. In this semester students will continue their study of these topics and begin applying them through the score study of two IB prescribed titles. Students are responsible for keeping a notebook of materials assembled from class work, participation in class activities, assignments, projects, quizzes, and tests. The objective of this course is for students to develop their knowledge, understanding and perception of music in relation to time, place and cultures. Developing a better understanding of all types and styles of music enables the student to make a more meaningful contribution to the various musical activities and organizations in which they may be involved. The student should possess basic music reading skills. This course cannot be taken in successive semesters. Students will complete work on music projects and listening requirements for certification in IB Music. The semester will culminate with the completion of the IB Music Listening Paper (exam).

IB HIGHER LEVEL ART
Prerequisite: Approval of Instructor

IB Diploma Certification
4 semester 4 credits
Grades 11,12

Students will participate in the developing of their own curriculum, which will include production, cultural investigation, international investigation, and quality artwork. Students will locate their own artistic voices through their Visual Arts Journals, finding historical and contemporary forms while investigating other cultures through guided learning one-on-one and in groups. This artistic journey will be a focus throughout the Visual Arts Journals.

Students will use the drawing and ceramics classrooms and have access to the dark room, the painting room, the computer room, the wood shop, the media arts room, and the art office in order to complete their work.

The artist as a person is impacted by place and culture. The students will study family connections, differences of symbols from culture to culture and connect historical differences to the present. Movements in art that cross international boundaries and became universal will be studied. The universality of aesthetics and the elements and principles of design will be studied not only to look at work but to also make artwork. The impact of the students discovery will be seen in their own artwork.

Options: Instead of a group 6 subject, a student may select an additional subject from one of the other groups.

The Core Requirements

There are three core requirements for students wishing to take receive the full IB diploma.

  1. Theory of knowledge TOK is an interdisciplinary requirement intended to stimulate critical reflection on the knowledge and experience gained inside and outside the classroom. The course challenges students to question the bases of knowledge, to be aware of subjective and ideological biases and to develop the ability to analyze evidence that is expressed in rational argument. TOK is a key element in encouraging students to appreciate other cultural perspectives. The course is unique to the IBO, which recommends at least 100 hours of teaching time spanning the Program’s two years.
  2. Creativity, action, service In order to educate the whole person and foster responsible, compassionate citizens, IB diploma candidates are required to complete CAS activities . The CAS component encourages students to share their energy and special talents with others. Students may, for example, participate in theatre or musical productions, sports and community service activities. Students should, through these activities, develop greater awareness of themselves, concern for others, and the ability to work cooperatively with other people.
  3. Extended Essay Each student has the opportunity to investigate a topic of special interest. The essay requirement acquaints DP students with the kind of independent research and writing skills expected by universities. It is recommended that a student devote a total of about 40 hours of private study and writing time to the essay. It may be written in any IB subject area currently taught at Goshen High School.

Enrollment Prerequisites

There are no prerequisites for entrance into the IB Diploma Program at Goshen High School. However, honors classes are strongly recommended. Interested students should consult with their guidance counselor.